Information was taken from WeatherUnderground: Even as Tropical Storm Irma continues to wallop parts of the Southeast U.S, the region will also need to keep an eye on Hurricane Jose over the next few days. Hurricane Jose is now wandering several hundred miles to the north of the Leeward Islands, after brushing them on Saturday as a high-end Category 4 storm with 155 mph winds. Jose will spend the next four days performing a slow clockwise loop without affecting any land areas. The rather odd forecast track is the result of a mid-level high to the east of Jose which will build south of Jose in 24 hours, then west of Jose in

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Information was taken from WeatherUnderground: Even as Tropical Storm Irma continues to wallop parts of the Southeast U.S, the region will also need to keep an eye on Hurricane Jose over the next few days. Hurricane Jose is now wandering several hundred miles to the north of the Leeward Islands, after brushing them on Saturday as a high-end Category 4 storm with 155 mph winds. Jose will spend the next four days performing a slow clockwise loop without affecting any land areas. The rather odd forecast track is the result of a mid-level high to the east of Jose which will build south of Jose in 24 hours, then west of Jose in

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Hurricane Jose pulled farther away from the Caribbean Sunday morning and is expected to weaken over the next few days, the National Hurricane Center said. In its 5 p.m. advisory, the NHC said the center of the storm was located about 400 miles northwest of the northern Leeward Islands — the easternmost in the chain of Caribbean Sea islands — and 285 miles east of Grand Turk Island. Jose has not had much movement through the early part of Sunday. “This motion is expected to continue tonight with a slowing of forwarding speed on Monday,” the NHC said. “Jose will begin turning toward the northeast Monday night, followed by a more eastward

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Hurricane Jose pulled farther away from the Caribbean Sunday morning and is expected to weaken over the next few days, the National Hurricane Center said. In its 5 p.m. advisory, the NHC said the center of the storm was located about 400 miles northwest of the northern Leeward Islands — the easternmost in the chain of Caribbean Sea islands — and 285 miles east of Grand Turk Island. Jose has not had much movement through the early part of Sunday. “This motion is expected to continue tonight with a slowing of forwarding speed on Monday,” the NHC said. “Jose will begin turning toward the northeast Monday night, followed by a more eastward

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Irma’s track up the Florida Peninsula will push a large amount of water toward the Georgia, South Carolina, and southeastern North Carolina coasts, threatening to cause coastal flooding in places such as Savannah, Charleston, and Myrtle Beach. These locations will also be on the northeastern side of the storm, heightening the risk of waterspouts and tornadoes. Heavy rain is forecast to spread inland toward the southern Appalachians from Monday to Tuesday, potentially leading to extensive flooding due to the mountainous and hilly terrain of northeastern Georgia, western South Carolina, eastern Tennessee and western North Carolina. The amount of rain that falls will lessen significantly beyond the Southeast as Irma runs into a

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Irma’s track up the Florida Peninsula will push a large amount of water toward the Georgia, South Carolina, and southeastern North Carolina coasts, threatening to cause coastal flooding in places such as Savannah, Charleston, and Myrtle Beach. These locations will also be on the northeastern side of the storm, heightening the risk of waterspouts and tornadoes. Heavy rain is forecast to spread inland toward the southern Appalachians from Monday to Tuesday, potentially leading to extensive flooding due to the mountainous and hilly terrain of northeastern Georgia, western South Carolina, eastern Tennessee and western North Carolina. The amount of rain that falls will lessen significantly beyond the Southeast as Irma runs into a

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Information has been taken directly from NASA: The large-scale structure of clouds in and around Hurricane Irma is seen in this animation and still image created with data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA’s Aqua satellite. The clouds are typical of tropical areas both nearby and away from tropical cyclones. Observations were taken at 1 p.m. EDT (5 p.m. UTC) on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, as Irma approached the Caribbean islands and was just becoming a powerful Category 5 storm. Each cylinder represents a volume of cloud detected by AIRS. The oval cylinder ends represent a region viewed by AIRS, with the oval sizes adjusted to reflect the proportion

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Information has been taken directly from NASA: The large-scale structure of clouds in and around Hurricane Irma is seen in this animation and still image created with data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA’s Aqua satellite. The clouds are typical of tropical areas both nearby and away from tropical cyclones. Observations were taken at 1 p.m. EDT (5 p.m. UTC) on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, as Irma approached the Caribbean islands and was just becoming a powerful Category 5 storm. Each cylinder represents a volume of cloud detected by AIRS. The oval cylinder ends represent a region viewed by AIRS, with the oval sizes adjusted to reflect the proportion

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On September 4, the sun started sputtering. A moderately large flare (classified as an M5.5) erupted at approximately 18:30 UTC. It produced a coronal mass ejection aimed at Earth. The sun continued to flare on September 5. A solar energetic particle event from the previous day’s activity arrived at the Earth, where it likely affected radio communications as well as the health of satellite systems. On September 6, the sun produced two massive X-class flares. This is the category for the strongest of all solar flares. NASA announced one was the most powerful since at least 2008. It produced another coronal mass ejection. Over the next day, the same sunspots continued to spit out more solar flares. It

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On September 4, the sun started sputtering. A moderately large flare (classified as an M5.5) erupted at approximately 18:30 UTC. It produced a coronal mass ejection aimed at Earth. The sun continued to flare on September 5. A solar energetic particle event from the previous day’s activity arrived at the Earth, where it likely affected radio communications as well as the health of satellite systems. On September 6, the sun produced two massive X-class flares. This is the category for the strongest of all solar flares. NASA announced one was the most powerful since at least 2008. It produced another coronal mass ejection. Over the next day, the same sunspots continued to spit out more solar flares. It

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As major Hurricane Irma moves closer to the United States, newly-formed Tropical Storm Jose will churn across the central Atlantic while Tropical Depression 13 may strengthen in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico this week. Tropical Storm Jose, which formed on Tuesday morning, is located thousands of miles southeast of the Lesser Antilles. Tropical Depression 13 formed Tuesday afternoon in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico. It may strengthen into Tropical Storm Katia and bring enhanced rainfall to eastern Mexico over the next few days. This projected path would take it near or just north of the Leeward Islands late this week and into the weekend, less than a week after major Hurricane Irma batters

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As major Hurricane Irma moves closer to the United States, newly-formed Tropical Storm Jose will churn across the central Atlantic while Tropical Depression 13 may strengthen in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico this week. Tropical Storm Jose, which formed on Tuesday morning, is located thousands of miles southeast of the Lesser Antilles. Tropical Depression 13 formed Tuesday afternoon in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico. It may strengthen into Tropical Storm Katia and bring enhanced rainfall to eastern Mexico over the next few days. This projected path would take it near or just north of the Leeward Islands late this week and into the weekend, less than a week after major Hurricane Irma batters

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Hurricane Irma grew into a powerful Category 4 storm Monday as it approached the northeastern Caribbean and was forecast to begin buffeting the region Tuesday. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 130 mph (215 kph) late Monday afternoon, and the U.S. National Hurricane Center said additional strengthening was expected. Irma was centered 490 miles (790 kilometers) east of the Leeward Islands and moving west at 13 mph (20 kph). U.S. residents are urged to monitor the storm’s progress in case it should turn northward toward Florida, Georgia or the Carolinas. “This hurricane has the potential to be a major event for the East Coast. It also has the potential to significantly strain

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Hurricane Irma grew into a powerful Category 4 storm Monday as it approached the northeastern Caribbean and was forecast to begin buffeting the region Tuesday. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 130 mph (215 kph) late Monday afternoon, and the U.S. National Hurricane Center said additional strengthening was expected. Irma was centered 490 miles (790 kilometers) east of the Leeward Islands and moving west at 13 mph (20 kph). U.S. residents are urged to monitor the storm’s progress in case it should turn northward toward Florida, Georgia or the Carolinas. “This hurricane has the potential to be a major event for the East Coast. It also has the potential to significantly strain

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A cold front running into a warm, humid air mass will lead to showers and thunderstorms developing across the interior Northeast to the Tennessee Valley on Tuesday. Many labor day plans will be spared, but the days following the holiday aren’t looking too promising. While some of the rain and storms may bring locally gusty winds, the greatest threat during these days will be slow-moving downpours and flash flooding. With periods of heavy rain falling over the same areas for a couple of days, there will be some flooding of roads and poor drainage areas. Flooding of small streams and creeks is also not out of the question. Why so much rain?

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A cold front running into a warm, humid air mass will lead to showers and thunderstorms developing across the interior Northeast to the Tennessee Valley on Tuesday. Many labor day plans will be spared, but the days following the holiday aren’t looking too promising. While some of the rain and storms may bring locally gusty winds, the greatest threat during these days will be slow-moving downpours and flash flooding. With periods of heavy rain falling over the same areas for a couple of days, there will be some flooding of roads and poor drainage areas. Flooding of small streams and creeks is also not out of the question. Why so much rain?

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Hurricane Irma is the main concern in the Atlantic basin at this particular time. Predicting which path she will take is difficult at this time, as models keep changing as she moves through the Atlantic. Hurricane preparation should be taken in advance, regardless of which path Irma takes. The National Hurricane Center has been issuing advisories for parts of the coast, in addition to issuing updated models. The ONLY weather site you should be following is The National Hurricane Center (NOAA). There are a lot of fake forecasts that are floating around social media and are causing panic for many residents on the East Coast. **THIS IS THE ONLY MODEL THAT YOU

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Hurricane Irma is the main concern in the Atlantic basin at this particular time. Predicting which path she will take is difficult at this time, as models keep changing as she moves through the Atlantic. Hurricane preparation should be taken in advance, regardless of which path Irma takes. The National Hurricane Center has been issuing advisories for parts of the coast, in addition to issuing updated models. The ONLY weather site you should be following is The National Hurricane Center (NOAA). There are a lot of fake forecasts that are floating around social media and are causing panic for many residents on the East Coast. **THIS IS THE ONLY MODEL THAT YOU

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The National Hurricane Center on Wednesday declared Irma the season’s ninth named storm. The NHC is projecting that the storm could intensify to hurricane status by Friday morning, though it’s still too soon to know whether it’ll pose a threat to anyone in the Caribbean or the US. The big question is where Irma will go. It’s in the eastern Atlantic, moving west at 10 to 15 mph. When it reaches the Antilles in the eastern Caribbean next week, researchers will be watching its path. If Irma passes over the islands or goes south of them, as some models predict, it could become a threat for locations in the Caribbean, Mexico, or the

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The National Hurricane Center on Wednesday declared Irma the season’s ninth named storm. The NHC is projecting that the storm could intensify to hurricane status by Friday morning, though it’s still too soon to know whether it’ll pose a threat to anyone in the Caribbean or the US. The big question is where Irma will go. It’s in the eastern Atlantic, moving west at 10 to 15 mph. When it reaches the Antilles in the eastern Caribbean next week, researchers will be watching its path. If Irma passes over the islands or goes south of them, as some models predict, it could become a threat for locations in the Caribbean, Mexico, or the

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