Skywatchers have a rare chance to easily locate Saturn as it passes close by the moon Thursday night (July 6), its famous rings wide open to our line of sight. The object that most people want to see in a telescope is the ringed planet Saturn, folks who own a telescope often claim that they have yet to see it. Right now Jupiter can be identified high in the west-southwest sky soon after sunset, it is the brightest object in the sky, aside from the moon. About one hour after sunset, look toward the south-southeast sky. Roughly one quarter up from the horizon to the point overhead will be a nearly

Advertisements
close

Skywatchers have a rare chance to easily locate Saturn as it passes close by the moon Thursday night (July 6), its famous rings wide open to our line of sight. The object that most people want to see in a telescope is the ringed planet Saturn, folks who own a telescope often claim that they have yet to see it. Right now Jupiter can be identified high in the west-southwest sky soon after sunset, it is the brightest object in the sky, aside from the moon. About one hour after sunset, look toward the south-southeast sky. Roughly one quarter up from the horizon to the point overhead will be a nearly

Advertisements
Read more

Posted in Space Weather

For every space buff in the world, there is a lot that has been discovered and a lot that still needs to be discovered. While NASA is to launch a rocket along the coast on Sunday, the International Space Station was visible to many on the coast tonight. To mix it up a little bit, I wanted to touch on some facts about the ISS. Listed below are a few fun facts about the ISS: – Sixty-five miles per hour may be a pretty standard speed limit on highways here on Earth, but up in orbit, the ISS travels a whopping 5 miles-per-second. That means the station circles the entire planet once

close

For every space buff in the world, there is a lot that has been discovered and a lot that still needs to be discovered. While NASA is to launch a rocket along the coast on Sunday, the International Space Station was visible to many on the coast tonight. To mix it up a little bit, I wanted to touch on some facts about the ISS. Listed below are a few fun facts about the ISS: – Sixty-five miles per hour may be a pretty standard speed limit on highways here on Earth, but up in orbit, the ISS travels a whopping 5 miles-per-second. That means the station circles the entire planet once

Read more

Posted in Space Weather

For all of you NASA buffs out there, red, blue and green clouds will dot skies across the East Coast on Sunday evening following a NASA rocket launch in Virginia. Known as “vapor tracers”, the harmless clouds are formed by an interaction between barium, strontium and cupric-oxide. Between 9:04 and 9:19 p.m., a sounding rocket will take off from the Wallops Flight Facility releasing colorful vapor clouds roughly 100 miles above the earth. Only certain parts of the East coast will be able to see these clouds, clear skies will make it easier to view. Most of us are sick of cloud cover over the past few weeks, so this will be

close

For all of you NASA buffs out there, red, blue and green clouds will dot skies across the East Coast on Sunday evening following a NASA rocket launch in Virginia. Known as “vapor tracers”, the harmless clouds are formed by an interaction between barium, strontium and cupric-oxide. Between 9:04 and 9:19 p.m., a sounding rocket will take off from the Wallops Flight Facility releasing colorful vapor clouds roughly 100 miles above the earth. Only certain parts of the East coast will be able to see these clouds, clear skies will make it easier to view. Most of us are sick of cloud cover over the past few weeks, so this will be

Read more

Posted in Space Weather

Scientists using data from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, have identified bright areas in craters near the moon’s south pole that are cold enough to have frost present on the surface. The icy deposits appear to be patchy and thin, and it’s possible that they are mixed in with the surface layer of soil, dust and small rocks called the regolith. The researchers say they are not seeing expanses of ice similar to a frozen pond or skating rink. Instead, they are seeing signs of surface frost. The frost was found in cold traps close to the moon’s south pole. Cold traps are permanently dark areas — located either on the floor

close

Scientists using data from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, have identified bright areas in craters near the moon’s south pole that are cold enough to have frost present on the surface. The icy deposits appear to be patchy and thin, and it’s possible that they are mixed in with the surface layer of soil, dust and small rocks called the regolith. The researchers say they are not seeing expanses of ice similar to a frozen pond or skating rink. Instead, they are seeing signs of surface frost. The frost was found in cold traps close to the moon’s south pole. Cold traps are permanently dark areas — located either on the floor

Read more

Posted in Space Weather

In order to protect people and systems that might be at risk from space weather effects, we need to understand the causes of space weather. The sun is the main source of space weather. Sudden bursts of plasma and magnetic field structures from the sun’s atmosphere called coronal mass ejections (CME) together with sudden bursts of radiation, or solar flares, all cause space weather effects here on Earth. Space weather can produce electromagnetic fields that induce extreme currents in wires, disrupting power lines, and even causing wide-spread blackouts. Severe space weather also produces solar energetic particles, which can damage satellites used for commercial communications, global positioning, intelligence gathering, and weather forecasting.

close

In order to protect people and systems that might be at risk from space weather effects, we need to understand the causes of space weather. The sun is the main source of space weather. Sudden bursts of plasma and magnetic field structures from the sun’s atmosphere called coronal mass ejections (CME) together with sudden bursts of radiation, or solar flares, all cause space weather effects here on Earth. Space weather can produce electromagnetic fields that induce extreme currents in wires, disrupting power lines, and even causing wide-spread blackouts. Severe space weather also produces solar energetic particles, which can damage satellites used for commercial communications, global positioning, intelligence gathering, and weather forecasting.

Read more

Posted in Space Weather